MEDIA RELEASE: COP28 Global Stocktake draft offers “small fruits among large thorns” 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

December 11, 2023 

Dubai, United Arab Emirates – The text released on the Global Stocktake (GST) on Monday evening, December 11, offers only “small fruits among large thorns,” says Julius Mbatia, ACT Alliance’s global climate justice programme manager. 

After nearly two weeks of discussions in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates’ presidency has presented a text to the plenary that offers very few wins amidst a sea of disappointing, unambitious provisions. 

 Julius Mbatia, ACT Alliance, comments: 

The GST text is weak in ambition.  It does not offer needed crucial decisions but typically restates previous agreements while carefully not committing to fully supporting NDCs and NAPs. 

The GGA text too carefully steers away from developed country obligations to provide finance to developing countries; only recalls COP26 doubling adaptation finance decision; and is silent on the future need for developed countries to provide finance for adaptation. This is not a  reassuring finance package amidst worsening climate impacts.

 Elena Cedillo, Lutheran World Federation, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group comments: 

The current text of the GST falls far, far short of what is needed to keep the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement. Governments must raise their ambition to face the climate emergency. The survival of our planet is at stake. 

 Rev. Tamsyn Kereopa of the Arawa & Tuwharetoa tribes, Anglican Church in Aotearoa New Zealand  and Polynesia comments: 

We are at a tipping point and strong commitments are needed now in order to safeguard Mother Earth and the life she supports. This text therefore comes as a devastating blow. It is tragic that politics and the economic interests of the powerful are still the strongest priority for many parties. Such short sightedness will be directly responsible for the coming irreversible damage. 

Maro Maua, Lutheran World Federation youth climate activist, comments: 

As youth participating in COP28, this is very disappointing. Governments must show commitment to future generations. Raising ambition is a must to provide a future for future generations. 

George Devendorf, Senior Director of External Relations, Church World Service, comments: 

Tonight’s draft agreements illustrate a remarkable degree of timidity at a time calling for courageous, principled action. As COP28 draws to a close, we implore nations to seize this moment, demonstrate true leadership, and deliver a robust, accountable, and just roadmap to help humanity navigate the daunting challenges that lie before us.  

 Savanna Sullivan, Lutheran World Federation, comments: 

I am angered by the lack of government commitment in the GST. Their actions prioritise the profits of a few over both the survival of the planet and over the voices of millions of young leaders calling for change. Phasing out of fossil fuels quickly is essential for the respect of God’s creation and the survival of future generations. 

Mattias Söderberg, DanChurchAid, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group comments: 

 The text throws out the target of 1.5.  It is a scandal. 

Most items are voluntary. If this document is adopted, the effect will depend fully on political will by parties. Text that could be positive is often couched in nebulous terms like “notes” and “could include” without actually requiring anything. In particular, finance – critical to implementation of ambitious mitigation, adaptation and loss and damage actions – is largely lacking from the new text. 

The new proposed #COP28 text will not lead us towards the 1.5 degree target. I do hope that parties continue to engage in the negotiations, to increase their ambition.

 ACT Alliance joins many parties in the developing world and civil society and other organisations in calling for a phase out of fossil fuels.  “This phase out must go hand in hand with a just transition and finance for the phase out to support developing countries as they shift,” notes Simon Chambers, ACT Alliance’s director of communications.  

Media contact: 

Simon Chambers, Director of Communications, ACT Alliance 

WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972 email: simon.chambers@actalliance.org 

COP28 Press release: The final stretch – ambition must go up, and not be watered down

Negotiations at the UN Climate Summit, COP28, are struggling. The usual conflicts over finance and equity are making it difficult for parties to agree. The new text, which builds on consultations with the parties, is a sign of some worrying  compromises, as they inadequately  acknowledge the seriousness of the climate crisis. Still, countries are far apart and getting ambitious decisions at this COP seems a tall order.  

This is despite COP 28 starting on a good note with the adoption of a decision to set up the Loss and Damage fund and funding arrangements. 

Nushrat Chowdhury, Climate Justice Policy Advisor, Christian Aid, comments:

  • This is a landmark  moment for communities and people on the frontline of climate induced loss and damage impacts. The fund must be capitalized and continuously replenished to a scale that meets the loss and damage impacts costed at hundreds of billions of dollars each year.

2023 has been full of climate related disasters, in both the global north and the global south, and climate scientists have delivered fresh and concerning research, indicating that we need bold and drastic decisions to manage the climate crisis.

Mattias Söderberg, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group, comments:

  • We must remember that the climate crisis is about people, and their lives and livelihoods.  For people who are displaced by flooding in South Sudan, or who face landslides in Nepal, the need for mitigation, adaptation and efforts to address loss and damage, is evident.

Controversial elements include the phasing out of fossil fuels. A phase out of all fossil fuels, not just unabated fossil fuels is urgently required in order to keep global temperature rise to 1.5C. However, failure to phase out fossil fuels without appropriate measures to create alternative income and employment and to ensure access to renewable energy for all through a just transition will have devastating impacts on growth and development around the world. Thus, climate finance, and initiatives to promote collaboration to ensure this just transition, is the key to a strong COP28 outcome.

Sara Savva Deputy Director GOPA-DERD/ACT Alliance – Member of ACT MENA CJWG comments:

  • If we do not act now, consequences will be terrifying for us all, especially for the most vulnerable in the global south, as worldwide temperature increase moves beyond 1,5 degrees.

Julius Mbatia, ACT Alliance global climate justice programme manager, comments:

  • It is undeniably true that the world must transition from fossil fuel-run development to greener, renewable energy powered development. This transition must be fair, and equitable with rich countries taking the lead and providing sufficient finance  to cushion the transition in countries without equal levels of wealth and capacity. 

Mattias Söderberg, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group, comments:

  • The only option we have is to phase out all fossil fuels. The alternative will be terrifying for us all, and global temperature increase will move beyond the 1,5 degree.
  • It is sad that this need is not acknowledged and respected by the global north. Finance and commitments about cooperation are a crucial block in these talks, and we will not have an ambitious outcome of fossil fuels unless we also have an ambitious outcome on finance.

Finally, the fact that the climate crisis is so critical, makes the Global Goal on Adaptation even more important. COP28 should adopt a framework for this goal, to ensure that we have  a blueprintfor adaptation action. It should present global targets for adaptation action, and guide governments, politicians and organizations, when they invest in adaptation, ensuring that their efforts have impact.

Sara Savva Deputy Director GOPA-DERD/ACT Alliance – Member of ACT MENA CJWG comments,

  • Without  a good blueprintfor adaptation, I am afraid the scarce adaptation funds will not have the desired impact. 
  • A blueprint  without targets indicators will be difficult to monitor, and if there are no references to funding, it will be very uncertain if the plans actually will be implemented. 
  • The current text for the Global Goal on Adaptation is far too weak, and it will not become the tool governments, organisations and politicians will need when they plan their adaptation interventions.  

Mattias Söderberg, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group, comments:

  • As ACT Alliance, we urge all the parties to come to consensus on a final decision at this COP that incorporates strong climate justice, clear indicators on the Global Goal for Adaptation, a full phase out of fossil fuels that includes a just transition, and adequate new and additional climate finance- in the form of grants, not loans- to meet the needs of countries and communities in the global south, who face the brunt of the impacts of climate change already.

Media contact:

Simon Chambers, director of communications, ACT Alliance
WhatsApp: +1-416-324-0972 email: simon.chambers@actalliance.org 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press conference at COP28: Voices of faith call for justice in COP28 decisions and actions

10 December 2023

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA ADVISORY

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Voices of faith share their calls to world leaders for justice in negotiations on topics such as fossil fuel transition, climate finance, loss and damage, human rights, and GST. Faith members, involved in climate advocacy, bring a unique perspective grounded in the moral call to climate change. This perspective influences their technical experience and their work with communities on the frontlines of the climate emergency.

85% of the world’s population ascribe to a faith tradition. Members of these faith communities work at the local, regional, national, and international levels to pursue climate justice. The Interfaith Liaison Committee brings together faith constituencies working to achieve climate justice to raise their voices together and share their stories from their traditions and experiences around the world..

What: Call for justice in GST, human rights, just transition, climate finance, Loss & Damage, Indigenous justice, and intergenerational justice.

Who: 

Lindsey Fielder Cook, Representative for the Human Impacts of Climate Change, Quaker United Nations Office, Gernamy
Mattias Søderberg, co-chair ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group, DanChurch Aid, Denmark
Maua Maro, youth climate activist, Lutheran World Federation, Kenya
Shantanu Mandal, youth climate activist, Brahma Kumaris, India
Elena Cedillo, co-chair ACT Alliance Climate Justice Group, Lutheran World Federation, Switzerland
Faith Sebwa, 12 years old, student of class VI, hearing impaired, Kenya
Rev. Henrik Grape, Senior advisor on Care for Creation, Sustainability, and Climate Justice for the World Council of Churches – Moderator

Where: Press Conference Room 2 Zone B6 building 77 and online

When: Monday, December 11, 2023 14:30-15:00 Dubai time

Why: Faith communities bring concrete experiences of the impact of climate change on the most vulnerable people, including women and girls in all their diversity and people on the move, who have done the least to cause climate change and are facing the brunt of its impacts. Faith groups are on the front lines, responding to climate change through mitigation, disaster risk reduction, adaptation, and more.

# # # # #

MEDIA CONTACT
Simon Chambers- WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972, Email: simon.chambers@actalliance.org
Director of Communications, ACT Alliance

COP28 Press release: media stunt- house of cards collapse to highlight crumbling climate financial architecture

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 8 December 2023 – ACT Alliance will be holding a media action at COP28 highlighting the weakness of the climate financial architecture, which has been failing to deliver for vulnerable countries who urgently need support to deal with the growing impacts of climate change.
 
The media action will consist of activists with banners, chanting, telling stories of the need for climate finance and climate justice, and building a house of cards, which will then be collapsed representing the dangers of a lack of robust climate financial architecture.  Interviews will be available with global faith based climate activists.
 
Where: Action zone 9, near the main entrance to the Blue Zone
 
When: December 8, 16:00-16:30
 
Climate finance is essential to implementing climate action, yet so far rich countries have failed to deliver on their promises. At COP28 this year, the Global Stocktake (GST) is predicted to affirm what we already know: we are completely off track to meet our international climate goals.  
 
Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement will be impossible without the immediate mobilisation of finance, to support countries to reduce carbon emissions, adapt to the advancing impacts of climate change, or compensate for the loss and damage already happening. At COP28, ACT Alliance will be reiterating its call for rich countries to pay up, by pledging significant levels of climate finance which is new and additional, public, and grants based.
 
Media contact:
Simon Chambers, Director of Communications, ACT Alliance
WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972 simon.chambers@actalliance.org

COP28 Press release: Climate crime scene media action

Climate crime scene media action

Time: 5th December 2023, 11h30

UPDATED Location Action Zone 9 (near the main entrance)

This visual stunt hosted by ACT Alliance and Don’t Gas Africa looks at a climate crime scene, with the outline of a body on the ground.  But who is the victim?  On energy day at COP28, join us to hear from vulnerable communities facing the brunt of the impacts of climate change, which speaks to the urgency of phasing out fossil fuels forever.

Powerful advocates from around the world will communicate how climate change disproportionately impacts communities across Africa and the Global South, who have done the least to contribute to climate change but are facing the worst of its effects.

Media Contact:
Simon Chambers, Director of Communications, ACT Alliance
WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972 simon.chambers@actalliance.org

COP28 Press statement: Two sides of the same coin: Climate and Gender Justice

Two sides of the same coin: Climate and Gender Justice

Dubai, UAE- Climate justice and gender justice are two sides of the same coin – there can be no climate justice without gender justice.  The climate emergency is not gender neutral. Women and girls in all their diversity are on the frontlines, often first and worst impacted by the climate crisis.  

Research has shown that women and girls are 14 times more likely to die in a disaster than men, and we know that many disasters are a result of the climate emergency.  As these disasters get more frequent and severe as global temperatures continue to rise, there is a risk that gender inequalities are exacerbated, unless gender-transformative action is taken, including in climate finance.

Extractive economic models, human rights and land violations, and structural gender barriers, require transformative and interconnected struggles for justice.  

ACT Alliance has released a new report today Climate finance and gender: Lessons from Nordic efforts to integrate gender equality in climate-related development finance. The report’s recommendations to the Nordic countries include advocacy, tracking of finance with a gender lens, that transformative gender approaches be used and more.  The report can be downloaded here.

ACT Alliance calls on COP28 to:

  •   fulfil the human rights-related promises that are a key part of the updated Gender Action Plan adopted at COP25.
  •   ensure that COP28 climate finance decisions are gender-responsive and that financing reaches women and girls in all their diversity.
  •   that the Gender Action Plan influences all decision-making at COP28.

Quotes 

Gloria Pua Ulloa, SEDI Asociacion Civil, Argentina “There’s no climate justice if women and girls, in all their diversity, are not included in all decision-making processes related to climate change.”

Hanna Soldal, Act Church of Sweden, Sweden: “Gender justice and climate justice are two faces of the same coin. Women and girls are 14 times more likely to die from climate induced disasters than men.  There can be no climate justice without gender justice.”

Christina Cosby, Presbyterian Church of the USA “Youth, Indigenous Women, and local communities, most affected by climate change, offer valuable wisdom for innovative solutions. In climate finance at COP28, their engagement must move beyond ‘involvement’ to meaningful action for a more equitable and fruitful policy. Drawing on our faith traditions, they guide us by understanding our past, have the key to where we need to go, and the wisdom on how to get there. Climate Finance and Gender Justice are two faces of the same coin—you cannot have one without the other.” 

Media contact

Simon Chambers, director of communications, ACT Alliance
WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972
Email: simon.chambers@actalliance.org

COP28 Press release: Media action- Two sides of the same coin: Climate and Gender Justice

Time: 4th December 2023, 16h00

Location UPDATED: Action Zone 9 (B1 near the entrance)

 This visual stunt will showcase calls for critical investment in gender-transformative climate finance.

The climate emergency is deepening gender inequalities. Extractive economic models, human rights and land violations, and structural barriers related to finance, education and health services, contribute to women and girls being 14 times more likely to die in a disaster than men. 

Powerful advocates from around the world will communicate how climate and gender justice are two sides of the same coin, and collectively call for gender-transformative and rights-based climate adaptation, finance, mitigation and disaster risk reduction

Interviews can be made available with: 

  • Gloria Pua Ulloa, SEDI, Argentina (English, Spanish)
  • Dr. Nahed Ayoub , Bishopric of Public, Ecumenical and Social Services (BLESS), Egypt (English, Arabic)
  • Hanna Soldal, Act Church of Sweden, Sweden (English, Swedish)

Media Contact:
Simon Chambers, Director of Communications, ACT Alliance
WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972 simon.chambers@actalliance.org

Press conference at COP28: Global faith voices join together at Interfaith Talanoa Dialogue in Dubai

3 December 2023

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA ADVISORY

Dubai, United Arab Emirates: People of faith have been engaging in climate justice work for decades.  Over 150 people of faith from around the world came together at the Interfaith Liaison Committee’s Talanoa dialogue on November 30 to discuss the three questions of a Talanoa: Where are we at, where do we want to go, and how do we get there in our work for climate justice at COP28.

As the World Leaders’ Summit has wrapped up, the ILC is working on its call to the COP  for increased action to achieve climate justice and help keep global temperature rise to under 1.5C.  

People of faith (Christian, Muslim, Sikh, Brahma Kumaris, and many others) bring the experiences of communities on the front lines of the climate emergency, they bring a moral dimension to the debate, and they also bring technical expertise through their engagement in combating climate change and in climate justice advocacy. 

85% of the world’s population ascribe to a faith tradition, and faith communities are part of all communities in the world.  They work as part of these communities together with local leaders and communities to address the impacts of climate change.

The Interfaith Liaison Committee to the UNFCCC brings together faith constituencies working to achieve climate justice to raise their voices together and share their stories from their traditions and experiences around the world.

What: Calls from people of faith from around the world for concrete action at COP28 towards achieving climate justice for the most vulnerable, and sharing stories of the impacts of climate change in communities around the world.

Who: 

Sister Jayanti Kirpalani  Additional Administrative Head of the Brahma Kumaris
Rev. Chebon Kernell, Indigenous, World Council of Churches
Ms. Lucy Plummer from youth from Soka Gakkai International
Mr. Harjeet Singh, head – global political strategy, CAN international
Ms. Valériane Bernard, Brahma Kumaris representative to the United Nations, Geneva- Moderator

Where: Press Conference Room 2 Zone B6 building 77 and online

When: Monday, December 4, 2023 13:30-14:00 Dubai time

Why: Faith communities bring concrete experiences of the impact of climate change on the most vulnerable people, including women and girls in all their diversity and people on the move, who have done the least to cause climate change and are facing the brunt of its impacts. Faith groups are on the front lines, responding to climate change through mitigation, disaster risk reduction, adaptation, and more.

# # # # #

 MEDIA CONTACT
Simon Chambers- WhatsApp: +1-416-435-0972, Email: simon.chambers@actalliance.org
Director of Communications, ACT Alliance

ACT ALLIANCE APPEAL UPHELD

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ACT ALLIANCE APPEAL UPHELD

Independent Appeal Panel upholds appeal by ACT Alliance.

Geneva, SwitzerlandFollowing HQAI’s decision to suspend ACT Alliance’s certification and the subsequent appeal by ACT Alliance against that decision, the Appeal Panel mandated by HQAI’s Advisory and Complaint Board (ACB) has stipulated that the audit report does not provide sufficient objective evidence to support the major corrective action request (CAR) M2023-8.4 and requests the HQAI Secretariat to withdraw the major finding and lift the suspension of the certificate with immediate effect. The HQAI Secretariat has also been asked to allocate additional resources and time to the next audit so that there can be a specific focus on issues identified in the now-revoked major corrective action.

What does this decision concretely mean?

  • The suspension of ACT Alliance’s certificate is lifted with immediate effect. The major CAR M2023-8.4 (The ACT Alliance Secretariat does not have the management and staff capacity to deliver the effective operation of its humanitarian mechanism – Appeal and RRF – in compliance with the CHS) has been withdrawn, and the audit report is subsequently being updated.
  • It confirms ACT Alliance’s unwavering commitment to Quality and Accountability and the CHS, as demonstrated through its longstanding audit journey since its initial CHS Certification in 2017.
  • ACT Alliance is committed to addressing all CHS audit findings, and the next certification audit (maintenance audit 2025) will follow its progress on ensuring sufficient management and staff capacity to deliver its humanitarian mechanism in compliance with the CHS. Before finalising and sharing the 2025 public audit report, HQAI will report detailed findings back to the ACB.
  • The appeal decision clearly demonstrates the impartiality of the ACB in its decisions and corroborates HQAI’s commitment to professionalism, impartiality, and objectivity. The independent accreditation body Accredia annually assesses HQAI’s impartiality as one of its audit criteria against ISO/IEC 17065:2015.
  • HQAI welcomes and values complaints and appeals and will use every case as an opportunity to learn and continue offering independent, adapted quality assurance services. HQAI will embark on a meaningful reflection and comprehensive analysis of the Appeal Panel’s findings to ensure that HQAI’s interpretation of audit findings is systematically substantiated by factual and objective evidence and clearly conveyed to our partners.

 

Background

On August 09, 2023, HQAI’s audit report identified a major corrective action request (major CAR M2023-8.4) on ACT Alliance’s renewal audit, leading to the suspension of the CHS certificate, which was communicated to ACT Alliance on August 11, 2023. ACT Alliance appealed against the audit decision on August 24, 2023. The subsequent investigation and decision by the Executive Director of HQAI to uphold the audit findings was not accepted by ACT Alliance and motivated ACT’s request for the appeal to be escalated to the ACB of HQAI, dated September 22, 2023. An independent Appeal Panel of two ACB members was formed to conduct a review process evaluating all the documents and records submitted by both parties to the appeal. The Appeal Panel decided to uphold the appeal. The decision is binding for both parties.

It should be noted that provisional suspensions are common practice in certification schemes across various sectors and can typically last up to six months. They are used to indicate situations where the management system of a certified organisation has undergone significant changes that impact the organisation’s ability to comply with a given standard or when one or more minor CARs could not be addressed within the specified timeframe. Unfortunately, despite being a normal part of the HQAI audit process of CHS, suspensions may still cause reputational damage to audited organisations even if, like ACT Alliance, they have consistently proven their long-standing commitment to Quality and Accountability and the CHS. It is therefore acknowledged that a better sector-wide understanding of the CHS certification process, its transparency and purpose, is necessary to ensure that audited organisations’ commitments to quality and accountability are recognised and valued. HQAI is committed to furthering this understanding.

Download the Word document here

 

Climate talks out of touch with reality 

Media release  

Climate talks out of touch with reality

Members of the ACT Alliance and ecumenical delegations call for more climate finance for the Global South, rather than more empty promises from rich countries around the world. Photo: Simon Chambers/ACT

Temperatures around the world are peaking. In some of the most vulnerable countries floods, droughts and cyclones are devastating communities and households. Climate change is a reality and deserves to be called a crisis. 

After two weeks of UN (United Nations) negotiations in Bonn, the parties seem to have forgotten what is at stake if we collectively fail to solve this crisis. Talks instead focused on what to prioritise on the agenda, processes for future agreements, and dialogues meant to help parties understand each other.  

As Mattias Söderberg, co-chair of the ACT Alliance Climate Justice group and a member of the ACT Alliance delegation at the Bonn talks, says, 

  • These talks are out of touch with reality. Rather than engaging in real discussions, parties gave speeches based on old positions and arguments, without reflecting on the crisis we are facing.  
  • As an international Christian network, we in Act Alliance are committed to caring for all creation. However, with the current system of world development, we, as humanity, are not living up to our responsibility. 

All parties are aware of the need to address the climate crisis. However, there is no agreement on who should act.  

Sostina Takure, ACT Alliance Zimbabwe Forum coordinator and ACT Bonn delegation member, says,  

  • The climate crisis is also a justice crisis. Communities with the smallest carbon footprints pay the highest price, while countries with the largest historic responsibility continue their emissions. Rich countries must take the lead in the fight against climate change. 
  • Climate justice must be reflected in the negotiations. Developed countries should deliver on their promises to mobilise climate finance and increase their support to adaptation.

The need for climate finance is clear. Without funds, there will be no action. This was also stressed during the talks about future climate finance in Bonn.  

In ACT Alliance we believe that future climate finance must build on the needs of vulnerable communities, and not on political compromises.  

As Mattias Söderberg says,  

  • Climate finance must be delivered to the most vulnerable countries as grants. The climate crisis must not be turned into a debt crisis. 
  • All financial flows in both developed and developing countries must contribute to the fulfilment of the Paris Agreement goals. However, this commitment should not be confused with developed countries’ obligations to mobilise climate finance.

At the upcoming climate summit, COP28, parties will adopt a global goal on adaptation. This goal will guide continued collaboration to enable successful and adequate adaptation for all. In Bonn, parties were expected to make progress in talks about this goal. In particular, they were expected to develop a better understanding of the goal. However, these talks did not deliver more than a commitment to continue talking.  

As Sostina Takure says,  

  • The progress in adaptation policy has been described as sluggish. Bonn offered little to no progress in identifying the global goal, and that is a genuine disappointment. Without adaptation funding people and communities are at risk when they face climate-related disasters and events. 
  • Countries must work out the global goal on adaptation in detail to achieve our shared aspiration of overcoming climate impacts and building resilience.

Lack of adaptation finance will increase climate-related loss and damage. This was an important topic on the Bonn agenda, yet once again parties left the meetings with very different views.  

As Mattias Söderberg says,  

  • We want the upcoming climate summit, COP28, to deliver the loss and damage fund as promised by ministers last year. The fund is important, as people on the frontlines of climate change are already experiencing loss and damage.  
  • The loss and damage fund should guarantee rapid and scaled up finance to vulnerable communities to protect lives, recover livelihoods, and for reconstruction following climate disasters. 

 

Media contacts: 

Mattias Söderberg 

ACT Alliance Climate Justice Co-chair,  

+45 29700609 

 

Fiona Connelly 

ACT Alliance Communications Coordinator 

+1 416 466-2428 

 

About ACT Alliance 

We are a global faith-based coalition organized in national and regional forums operating in more than 120 countries. 

Through our more than 140 members, we work on humanitarian aid, gender 

and climate justice, migration and displacement, and peace and security to support local communities. Our goal is to promote a locally-led and coordinated approach to advocacy, humanitarian and developmental issues. 

 

Basic Facts about the Alliance 

 

ACT Alliance is composed of more than 140 faith-based member organisations working in long-term development, advocacy and humanitarian assistance. 

 

  • Our members work in more than 120 countries
  • Our members employ more than 30,000 staff and volunteers globally
  • Our members mobilise approximately more than $ 2 billion each year
  • The alliance is supported by an international Secretariat of more than 25 staff based in Geneva, Bangkok, New York, Toronto, Amman, Bogota, Nairobi and Brussels.
  • ACT Alliance was established on 1 January 2010 by bringing together the vision, resources, the people of the organisations who have been working together since 1995 as ACT International and since 2003 as ACT Development.