Humanitarian

ACT Alliance demonstrates its value as the leading faith-based alliance in humanitarian response by working with faith and humanitarian actors at the global, regional, national, and community levels. ACT harnesses the combined strength of its members in delivering humanitarian response at scale and with considerable reach through joint programming approaches.

We commit to an effective ecumenical response that saves lives and maintains dignity, irrespective of race, gender, belief, nationality, ethnicity, or political persuasion. Humanitarian needs define our priorities and the humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence guide our actions. We remain committed to strengthening the resilience of affected communities and to being accountable to people and communities affected by a crisis. The ACT Alliance Secretariat is certified against the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability and is committed to the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response.

We are active in more than 120 countries worldwide

Through its national, regional and sub-regional forums ACT Alliance provides humanitarian and emergency preparedness support to local communities helping them during a crisis and to become more resilient.

READ MORE

ACT humanitarian mechanism

The Rapid Response Fund is an innovative funding mechanism designed to put local communities at the centre of decision-making and is recognised as one of few such funding mechanisms across the sector. The RRF provides valuable opportunities to demonstrate the niche of faith actors in humanitarian response as we work closely with local ACT members and their community networks. On average, the RRF funds 20 emergencies annually and responses are implemented within six months.

The primary mechanism for large scale or global emergencies, including protracted crises: ACT Alliance raises an appeal to its membership with both requesting and funding members co-owning the process. Appeals are open for funding during their entire project period and accessible to both national and international ACT Alliance members.

Consortia represent a new funding mechanism for ACT Alliance. As part of Emergency Preparedness planning, consortiums are established before a disaster strikes and consortium members share a vision and strategic focus. Members self-organise and develop their own financial management models and programme strategies supported by the EPRP process and tools.

Emergency preparedness and response planning is integral to the strengthening of ACT Alliance’s capacity to respond effectively in emergencies through joint programming.

ACT national and regional forums develop emergency preparedness and response plans (EPRPs), working collaboratively to understand potential disaster risks and plan how to respond to emergencies quickly and effectively. Forum EPRPs are accessible by members through an online platform, which can be viewed by other members who may be interested to support them. ACT Forums use specific ACT guidelines and tools to support the process of developing an EPRP which is reviewed regularly.

EPRP platform

As part of the holistic and integrated approach to humanitarian response, development and advocacy, ACT’s emergency preparedness and humanitarian response is supported by stronger humanitarian coordination and advocacy with stakeholders and duty bearers.

In the current strategic period our advocacy focuses on three banner commitments to the Grand Bargain at the World Humanitarian Summit where ACT has made significant investments and where member engagement is quite strong: the localisation agenda and the primary role of national/local members and local faith actors; demonstrating the important role of faith actors in humanitarian response; and strengthening of cash-based programming across the humanitarian sector.


No.
Name
Date | Time
Location

Zimbabwe is experiencing a severe drought due to significant below average rainfall. On 4th April 2024, the president of Zimbabwe declared drought a national disaster as the El Nino induced dry weather conditions have resulted in widespread food insecurity among drought affected rural communities who heavily rely on agriculture. Two ACT Zimbabwe national members with support from ACT Church of Sweden are intending to support 4,000 people in the affected districts with Cash Transfer interventions among out important initiatives. RRF 08 2024 Zimbabwe Drought Addtl

Zimbabwe is experiencing a severe drought due to significant below-average rainfall experienced during the last rainy season October 2023– March 2024 (ReliefWeb). The country received less than 20% of the typical rainfall expected during this season. El Niño events in Zimbabwe appears every two to six years and have been associated with prolonged dry spells, reduced rainfall, and increased temperatures.  Water shortages and loss of crops are often the effect, affecting food security and livelihoods.  On 4th April 2024, the president of Zimbabwe declared drought a national disaster in Zimbabwe (BBC). All 72 districts are affected in varying degrees with 30/72 being the most affected (OCHA, 5 May 2024). ACT Zimbabwe National Member MEDra is planning to respond using RRF funds through providing unconditional cash / Vouchers to 1440 people, implement WASH activities and provide Psycho social Support over the period of 3 months. RRF 07 2024 Zimbabwe Drought

The Government of Malawi declared a state of disaster due to drought, brought about by a dry season. The Government of Malawi estimates that about nine million people have been affected by drought, which has been considered as the worst in years, with February 2024 recorded as the driest and hottest month since 1981 (SADC Regional Humanitarian Appeal, May 2024). The drought has been persistent in the southern Africa regions affecting the whole Zambesi basin (JRC Global Drought Observatory, Drought in Southern Africa, April 2024). Churches Action in Relief and Development (CARD) and Evangelical Lutheran Development Service (ELDS) in Malawi are planning to respond to the drought using Rapid Response Funds to support people affected by the drought. The project will target women and children headed households, people with disabilities, the elderly and chronically ill among other vulnerable groups. RRF 06 2024 Malawi Drought

The escalating conflict in Gaza that started on the 7th of October has impacted the whole Middle East region, with cross-border incidents into Lebanon. Daily clashes have been reported over the Blue Line, the demarcation line on Lebanon’s southern border since 8th of October.
As of 18 April, 92,621 individuals (51% females) have been displaced from south Lebanon due to the ongoing hostilities along the Blue Line. The Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has reported a total of 340 killed and 1,324 people wounded. It is estimated that at least 60,000 persons have remained in border villages and are highly affected by exchanges of fire while having lost livelihoods and income.  The socio-economic frailty of communities, especially those in difficult-to-access locations dependent on agriculture, has intensified due to the continued hostilities. As the situation deteriorates, the ability of those lacking social protection (refugees, women and girls, PwD) to ensure the dignity will decline, increasing dependence on service providers, exposing them to exploitation and abuse.
Satellite images reveal that fires ignited by shelling, the usage of white phosphorous and flare bombs used have ravaged 790 hectares of land in southern Lebanon, estimated to have killed more than 50,000 olive trees. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports that 63% of farmers have had difficulty accessing their fields safely, while 26% have had to leave their agricultural lands altogether due to displacement. Moreover, 23% of farmers have seen a reduction in their crop yields. Transportation of agricultural goods also presents a challenge for 85% of farming households.
ACT Lebanon Forum members Christian Aid, DanChurchAid, DSPR- JCC, Middle East Council of Churches (MECC) and Norwegian Church Aid (NCA) are responding to this conflict with an appeal to raise USD 1.5M USD for responding to the urgent needs with special focus on people who have been directly affected by the current conflict in the South of Lebanon.

On Tuesday, April 30, 2024 at 02:35 WITA, Mount Ruang in Sitaro Regency, North Sulawesi, Indonesia erupted with a maximum amplitude of 55 mm and a temporary duration of ± 10 minutes. This eruption was a continuation from the April 16 eruption. Based on the government’s report and initial assessment, the disaster indicates a moderate impact and is categorised as medium-scale emergency. Around 20,000 people from 12 villages in Tagulandang Resort are greatly affected by this eruption. Communities within a radius of 4-6 km from Mount Ruang have evacuated independently, including those from Bahoi Village, Balehumara Village, Barangka Pahe Village, Mahangian Village, Tulusan Village, Lesa Village and Lesa Rende Village. People were displaced in Sitaro Regency and North Minahasa Regency. Volcanic ash covered the roads and houses by 2-5 cm, hampering the activities of the community. It also covered several airports around the North Sulawesi region including Sam Ratulangi Manado Airport, Djalaludin Gorontalo Airport, Melonguane Airport, Siau Airport, and Naha Airport, causing access to the North Sulawesi region to be impassable by air for the next couple of days. According to initial assessments, Food, NFIs, Health and protection are the main needs for the people in the IDPs camps. ACT alliance members PELKESI and YEU with the support from RRF will be providing primary health care services, distribution of health kits, food packages, Shelter kits and psycho-social support to kids. The project is targeting around 6000 beneficiaries in the affected areas of Sitaro district. RRF 04 2024 Indonesia Volcanic Eruption

Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil, has experienced heavy rains that have flooded 452 municipalities. As of May 15, 2024, these floods have affected over 2 million people, resulting in 538,126 displaced, 76,588 in shelters, approximately 806 injured, 149 confirmed deaths, and 108 missing persons (Civil Defense Bulletin of the State of Rio Grande do Sul). In early May, continuous heavy rains in Porto Alegre, the Metropolitan Region, and the Vale do Rio Pardo led to the declaration of a state of public calamity on May 2. Porto Alegre, with 1.3 million inhabitants, has 157,000 affected people. Approximately 1.2 million people in Rio Grande do Sul are without electricity. Among the 149 deceased, 103 have been identified, including 37 from the Porto Alegre Metropolitan Region, encompassing various age groups from children to the elderly. Initial estimates suggest an economic impact of at least USD 2.5 billion, which is expected to grow as more storms are forecasted. The agriculture sector is significantly affected, with soybean prices rising due to harvest reduction fears, and potential impacts on rice, beans, pork, and poultry production. The floods have destroyed homes, workplaces, roads, bridges, and essential infrastructure and services such as drinking water, power supply, and communication. The situation worsened on May 13 with renewed rains and rising river levels, causing further evacuations of many residents who had previously returned home. This flood is the largest in the history of Rio Grande do Sul. By Monday, May 13, rainfall in Porto Alegre reached 341.7 millimeters for the month, far exceeding the average May rainfall of 113 millimeters (National Institute of Meteorology Inmet). Civil Defense has issued alerts for most of the state's river basins, projecting water levels to exceed flood thresholds. The Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFGRS) warns of further rises in water levels due to rainfall and wind effects, with the Guaíba River’s levels expected to exceed 5 meters. According to a needs assessment conducted by the Fundação Luterana de Diaconia (FLD), the most urgent humanitarian needs are identified in the sectors of food assistance, WASH, and Community-Based Psychosocial Support (CBPS). This action, to be implemented by the FLD, aims to assist 556 families affected by the floods, directly benefiting over 2,780 people. These beneficiaries include women involved in the solidarity economy, waste collectors, indigenous Guarani and Kaingang communities, quilombola communities, and agroecological family farmers in the three most affected regions of the state: the Metropolitan Region, Vale dos Sinos, and Vale do Rio Pardo, over a three-month period. RRF 03 2024 Brazil floods

The Philippines is currently facing a catastrophic drought, one of the slow-onset effects of climate change, along with other climate impact drivers such as rising sea levels, increased precipitation, stronger wind patterns, and typhoons. This catastrophic drought is driven by the 2023-24 El Niño, which is, according to the United Nations weather agency, one of the five strongest on record. Climate Change Commission defines Drought as a decrease of 21 to 60 percent in rain occurrences for five consecutive months, or below normal rainfall conditions for three consecutive months. Additionally, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geographical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) reported on March 25 that 37 provinces have experienced drought conditions (3 consecutive months of way below normal rainfall conditions/more than 60% reduction from rainfall average), 22 provinces with dry spell (3 consecutive months of below normal rainfall condition/21%-60% reduction from rainfall average) and 12 provinces with dry condition (2 consecutive months of below normal rainfall condition). Five (5) provinces declared a state of calamities due to the worst effects of drought in their area, namely Occidental Mindoro (IV-B), Negros Occidental (VI), Sultan Kudarat (XII), and Maguinadanao Del Norte, Maguindanao Del Sur (BARMM). Besides these provinces, 34 local government units also declared a state of calamity. According to the data released by the Philippines Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Disaster Response Operations Monitoring and Information Center (DROMIC), as of 24 April 2024, there were 531,114 families or 2,283,636 persons affected in 3,053 villages in 11 Regions. Food and other livelihood support is the main need of the time. It is expected that the need for food and livelihood support in the affected areas is going to increase. ACT Alliance member National Counsel of Churches in Philippines (NCCP)  with the support from RRF mechanism addressing the urgent needs by providing food packs to 2,400 households, distribution of multi-purpose cash assistance to 300 households and Construction of 2 water pumps/deep wells for 2 communities. link to the detailed proposal attached below. NCCP_ACT-RRF-Proposal-El Nino Drought

The Global Rapid Response Fund (GRRF) is an annual funding appeal administered by the ACT Alliance secretariat. The fund prioritises ACT local and national members in line with our localisation commitments and in recognition of the distinct advantage these members have in providing timely, high quality, locally led emergency response interventions. Funds for the RRF are provided by ACT Alliance members and non-members. The total request for funding this year is USD 2,529,167 with a total budget of USD3,250,000, and with last year’s balance carried over of USD 720,833.07. This request will provide assistance in communities impacted by humanitarian crises up to 20 local contexts with a maximum funding ceiling of USD$150,000 per local member. GRRF proposals are assessed based on the ACT Scale up criteria which includes a requirement for requesting members to include a needs assessment and updated EPRP as part of their application for funding. RRF funding projects are normally between a minimum two and maximum six-month duration. Anticipatory action will be piloted this year where an additional allocation of USD 250,000 will be earmarked. GRRF24 Appeal  

In Eastern DRC, militia commonly known as wazalendo (patriots), have joined forces with Government military forces (FARDC) to fight rebel groups (including M23) who have terrorized North and South Kivu for nearly two years in the Masisi territory (United Nations Group of Experts on the DRC).  The fighting and displacement which was previously taking place and affecting persons within the greater Masisi territory in North Kivu area has now spread to other parts of Eastern DRC including Sake, a town of strategic importance.  Heavy fighting between the Congolese army and M23 rebels has escalated between 28th January -12 February 2024 in the territories of Masisi, Rutshuru and Nyiragongo, fueling regional tensions and causing an increase of displacement of 13 percent according to IOM with 1.65 million people currently displaced in North Kivu alone  The escalation of tensions in recent weeks has triggered a continued movement of populations  previously living in camps or with host families towards the province of South Kivu in Kalehe territory, in the direction of Goma and surrounding areas (Relief Web) and to Uganda and Tanzania.  ACT Members in DRC, Uganda and Tanzania are planning to respond to the affected through a regional appeal. CEA 241 Emergency Response to DRC Conflict. DRC Results Framework

February 2024 marks two years since the Russian invasion in Ukraine. Heavy fighting and attacks continue to impact 3.7 million internally displaced people, with 111,500 people residing in collective sites and 6.5 million refugees seeking safety, mostly across Europe. The Appeal has been revised using updated needs assessments of ACT members (AIDRom, Christian Aid, Church World Service, HEKS/EPER, Hungarian Interchurch Aid and Lutheran World Federation) and findings and recommendations from the external evaluation conducted in December 2023 – January 2024. Based on this revision and the funds received, the new budget requested is 25,612,489  USD. UKR221 Appeal Extension Final UKR221 Results Framework Extension  

After nearly 13 years of conflict, Syria remains a complex humanitarian and protection emergency characterized by ongoing hostilities and their long-term consequences, including widespread destruction of civilian infrastructure, economic collapse, explosive ordnance contamination, Covid 19, and one of the largest numbers of internally displaced people in the world. Compounding this situation, an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8, with at least 1,200 aftershocks have been reported (occurred at Central Turkey near the city of Gaziantep), followed by a second earthquake of 7.5 magnitude on February 6, 2023.  Striking communities during winter, these earthquakes left hundreds of thousands of people, including vulnerable populations such as children and the elderly, without access to essential resources like shelter, food, water, heat, and medical care in freezing temperatures. The disaster severely affected at least 15.73 million people in Turkey and Syria, resulting in a tragic loss of over 55,000 lives and nearly 130,000 injuries. The earthquakes led to the displacement of millions from their homes. In Syria, close to 9 million people were impacted, with the most significant damage concentrated in the north-western regions, particularly Aleppo and Idlib. In these areas, more than 7,400 buildings were either completely or partially destroyed, exacerbating the already dire humanitarian situation in the region. As the situation is moving from emergency to recovery, Syria is experiencing further despair either in its political instability or economic downfall, the situation is ever-changing and even more dire. ACT Syria Forum members and HIA are responding together to deliver life-saving and early recovery support to a targeted 1.5 million beneficiaries. This 4th revision is based upon the updated needs assessments of ACT members in the appeal (CA, GOPA-DERD, HEKS/EPER, the LWF, MECC and HIA in Türkiye ). This includes an update of the results framework, budgets and the integration a Survivor & Community Led Response (SCLR) approach by of Christian Aid through their local partners.   Based on this revision and funds received, the new budget requested is 3,520,892 USD. SYR231 - Syria Turkey Response Revision 4 Results-Framework SYR231- Revision 4 Links to the previous versions: Syria and Türkiye: Syria Protracted Crisis – Developing the Resilience of Affected People and Emergency Response for Affected Communities of Syria-Türkiye Earthquake – SYR231- Revision 3 – ACT Alliance Syria and Türkiye: Syria Protracted Crisis – Developing the Resilience of Affected People and Emergency Response for Affected Communities – SYR231- Revision 2 | ACT Alliance Syria: Syria Protracted Crisis – Developing the Resilience of Affected People and Emergency Response for Affected Communities of Syria-Türkiye Earthquake- SYR231- Revision 1 | ACT Alliance SYRIA: Syria Protracted Crisis – Developing the Resilience of Affected People – SYR231 | ACT Alliance

On 7 October 2023, Palestinian militant groups launched a major attack on Israel from the Gaza Strip. The attack included rocket barrages and vehicle-transported attacks across the border on Israeli communities and forces. In response, the government of Israel declared a state of emergency and war; The Israeli military retaliated by conducting a counteroffensive and an extensive aerial bombardment campaign on Gaza followed by an invasion. This conflict created a short-term crisis for families from Gaza Strip, as many of the Gazans who were visiting Jordan, families and students, were severely affected and got stuck due to the borders closure into Gaza and were not able to return. Thus, forcing them to stay in Jordan with no source of income and having to cover their own survival needs in Jordan such as paying rent, securing their basic daily needs (food, non-food, medications), and students who are already studying at the Jordanian universities lost all financial support to continue their studies Adding to this, the context created a negative impact on psychological wellbeing of these people who were stuck in Jordan resulting a sense of helplessness, stress, and insecurity. There is no ceasefire in sight and therefore the situation of Gaza families and students is expected to continue at least for three from the time a ceasefire is reached. ACT Jordan Forum member DSPR is planning to support around 1,230 most vulnerable people directly affected by the current conflict  with MPCA, shelter and MHPSS. RRF15-2023 Jordan


No.
Name
Date | Time
Location

El Salvador has experienced heavy rains since June 14, resulting in 13 deaths and widespread flooding, prompting a 15-day State of Emergency. The General Directorate of Civil Protection in El Salvador has issued a series of progressive alerts in response to the ongoing tropical storm. The alert levels began with Green and Yellow on June 13, escalated to Orange on June 14, and reached Red on June 16, reflecting the increasing severity of the situation. As of June 20, orange alerts are in place for 18 municipalities, and red alerts for 26 municipalities due to saturated soil and rising river levels. The Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARN in Spanish) reports two low-pressure systems bringing heavy rainfall from the Pacific Ocean, forecasting ongoing urban flooding, flash floods, river overflows, landslides, and rockfalls. The Hydrological Forecast Center warns of severe urban flooding, river overflows, and widespread inundation. Between June 14 and 20, rainfall reached a maximum of 680 mm in Ahuachapán (West) and 604.8 mm in San Miguel (East). The probability of overflows remains high in several rivers and hydrographic regions. According to the Situation Report No. 7 from the General Directorate of Civil Protection, the recent tropical storm has affected 4,045 people in El Salvador. The disaster has resulted in 13 fatalities, 12 injured people, and 2 missing people. Currently, 3,893 people are taking refuge in shelters, while 125 individuals have been evacuated but remain unsheltered. The report highlights the significant impact on the population and underscores the urgent need for ongoing support and resources. 121 shelters have been established, with 112 currently active, serving 1,508 families, including people with disabilities and pregnant women. Reports indicate 589 instances of damage to vital infrastructure, 312 affected homes, and 893 additional incidents. Humanitarian needs include food, hygiene kits, clothing, sanitation products, and items for babies and pregnant women. Due to the Jalponga river overflow, communities such as Hoja de Sal, El Pito, El Recuerdo, and Río Viejo in Santiago Nonualco district have been heavily impacted, leading to the establishment of shelters in the Communal House and the Hoja de Sal Educational Complex, evacuating 20 families. In Villas de San Pedro, the Community Center is now a shelter, and in San José Luna, the Communal House has been enabled due to the Jiboa River overflow, affecting roads and homes, leading to the evacuation of 32 families. As per official reports and initial community monitoring, food security is a primary concern due to significant crop losses and disruptions to livelihoods such as informal trade and artisanal fishing. It is imperative to enhance protection and response measures within the food security sector, prioritizing physical safety and promoting community resilience against future climate events. Most pressing needs have been identified in the sectors Mental Health and Psychosocial Support, Protection (to prevent GBV), Food Security and Livelihoods. The ACT Forum El Salvador members (the Lutheran Synod of El Salvador and ALFALIT), are seeking to provide humanitarian support in the following sectors:

  • Cash for food security and livelihoods
  • Community-Based Psychosocial Support (CBPS)
  • Protection (preventing gender-based violence (GBV) and providing psychosocial support services to survivors)
Their plan involves activating the ACT Humanitarian Mechanism via a Rapid Response Fund (RRF) to reach 875 families in the 10 most affected districts, totaling 3,250 people (approximately 1,950 women and 1,300 men). 20240623_Alert_El_Salvador_Floods

Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) has issued a heatwave alert for much of the country, with particular emphasis on Punjab and Sindh provinces. According to an NDMA announcement on Thursday, heatwave conditions are expected to develop over most regions starting May 21, escalating to severe heatwave conditions between May 23 and May 27. The forecast includes three separate heatwave spells: the initial one lasting two to three days, followed by a second spell towards the end of May lasting four to five days, and a third spell in early June lasting three to five days. The geographical areas affected include most parts of Pakistan, with a focus on Punjab and Sindh provinces. Specific districts in Sindh, such as Tharparkar, Umerkot, Sanghar, Badin, and Khairpur, are particularly impacted during the second heatwave spell. Daytime temperatures are expected to remain 4-8°C above normal in these regions, exacerbating the conditions.  Immediate health risks include heat strokes, heat cramps, and aggravation of existing health conditions, potentially leading to fatalities. The demand for medical services and cooling centers increases significantly. Establishing heatwave treatment and facilitation centres for communities is essential but beyond their capacity. Given the similar situation across at-risk districts, urgent support from humanitarian organizations is imperative. Immediate requirements include fully-equipped facilitation centres staffed with paramedics for providing first aid treatment. There is also a pressing need for community awareness campaigns to prevent direct sun exposure, dehydration, and the provision of flexible labour hours. Community World Service Asia (CWSA), in collaboration with district authorities, intends to establish six heatwave centres or camps in Umerkot district for a duration of four months. These facilities include a central site in Umerkot city, three additional camps at health facilities already supported by CWSA projects i.e. Government dispensary Ramsar, Government Dispensary Jhamrari, and Government Dispensary Cheelband and two more location will be identified for heat wave facilitation centres in consultation with district government. ACT Alert (Pakistan Heatwave Emergency) _ 2024

Since April 29, Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil, has experienced heavy rains that flooded 452 municipalities. As of 15 May 2024, these floods have affected more than two million people, where 538,126 displaced with 76,588 in shelters, about 806 have been injured, 149 confirmed deaths, and 108 missing persons (Civil Defense Bulletin of the State of Rio Grande do Sul. Issued on the 15th of May 2024). In Porto Alegre, the Metropolitan Region, and the Vale do Rio Pardo, heavy and constant rains began in early May, prompting public authorities to declare a state of public calamity on 2nd May. The situation worsened on May 13, with a resurgence of rains and rising river levels, leading to the evacuation of many who had returned to their homes. Porto Alegre, with 1.3 million inhabitants, has 157,000 affected people. This flood is the largest in the history of Rio Grande do Sul. By Monday, May 13, rainfall in Porto Alegre reached 341.7 millimeters for the month, exceeding the average May rainfall of 113 millimeters (National Institute of Meteorology Inmet). According to the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFGRS), the main concern at the moment is the further rise in levels due to rainfall and wind effects. All scenarios projected by the Institute of Hydraulic Research (IPH-UFGRS) for the next week indicate a prolonged rise in the Guaíba's water levels, with a subsequent peak expected to exceed 5 meters. The economic impact is significant, characterized by substantial damage to critical infrastructure and disruptions to food and water distribution systems. Over a million households are currently experiencing water shortages, and the isolation of Porto Alegre poses a threat to agriculture, which is vital to the state's economy. Authorities have issued warnings of imminent food shortages and price increase that could have ripple effects across the nation. Please see the infographic of this disaster on https://reliefweb.int/report/brazil/maior-catastrofe-climatica-do-rs-abril-maio-de-2024-pt Communities are devastated. The affected population has lost their homes, belongings, and livelihoods. Among the most affected populations are women from solidarity economic enterprises and their families, the majority of whom are women who already lived communities deeply affected by economic and social inequalities and in high-risk areas. 2,500 informal recyclable waste collectors, including women, lost their livelihood due to the floods in the Metropolitan Region of Porto Alegre and the Vale do Rio dos Sinos. Many of them had their homes, which are also their workspaces, completely flooded and left in a hurry, leaving everything behind. Households dependent on family and agroecological farming have had their properties flooded, losing production, many animals, and machinery, mainly in the Vale do Rio Pardo region. In quilombola communities (communities of descendants of Afro-Brazilian slaves who escaped from slavery in colonial Brazil and formed their own settlements), the situation is serious. Many are still stranded, without access to water, energy, and food. In the Machado Quilombo and the Quilombola Front of Rio Grande do Sul, a quilombola leader categorically stated that "97% of the area is a total loss.” For this emergency, the Lutheran Foundation for Diaconia (FLD) is seeking, jointly with community associations, to provide direct emergency response to 500 families (over 2,500 people) in the sectors of food security (delivery of food items), WASH (delivery of cleaning and hygiene products), and Community-based Psychosocial Support (CBPS). As a context, a humanitarian corridor has been established in the city to transport essential items such as food, water, and medicine. Access to the humanitarian corridor for transporting food and essential items is granted to community associations, in coordination with the municipality. This enables the identification of the most needed items and ensures their delivery to the affected population, including the most vulnerable. ACT Alert Brazilian Floods 2024

Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Malawi are some of the most drought affected Southern Africa countries having received less than 20% of the typical rainfall expected during the last season. The poor rains have been attributed to the on-going El Niño Southern Oscillation effects (World Weather Attribution). On 23rd March 2024, Malawi government declared a state of emergency in 23 out of 28 drought affected districts (afrinews) , in Zimbabwe on 4th April 2024 the president of Zimbabwe declared the drought situation in Zimbabwe to be a national disaster (BBC) while in Zambia and the drought was also declared a national disaster on 29th February 2024 as 84 out of 116 districts nationally have been affected (afrinews) by drought induced El Nino effects. ACT Forum members in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Zambia are planning to respond to the people affected by drought. SAF 241 Drought Response

On Tuesday, April 30, 2024 at 02:35 WITA, Mount Ruang in Sitaro Regency, North Sulawesi, Indonesia erupted with a maximum amplitude of 55 mm and a temporary duration of ± 10 minutes. This eruption was a continuation from the April 16 eruption. Based on the government’s report and initial assessment, recently, the disaster indicates a moderate impact and is categorised as medium-scale emergency. Around 20,000 people from 12 villages in Tagulandang Resort are greatly affected by this eruption. Communities within a radius of 4-6 km from Mount Ruang have evacuated independently, including those from Bahoi Village, Balehumara Village, Barangka Pahe Village, Mahangian Village, Tulusan Village, Lesa Village and Lesa Rende Village. People were displaced in Sitaro Regency and North Minahasa Regency. Volcanic ash covered the roads and houses by 2-5 cm, hampering the activities of the community. It also covered several airports around the North Sulawesi region including Sam Ratulangi Manado Airport, Djalaludin Gorontalo Airport, Melonguane Airport, Siau Airport, and Naha Airport, causing access to the North Sulawesi region to be impassable by air for the next couple of days. According to initial assessments, Food, NFIs, Health and protection are the main needs for the people in the IDPs camps. The ACTIF forum members PELKESI, YEU and MBM are operating in the areas and are planning to respond the emergency through the RRF mechanism. Indonesia_Alert_Mt. Ruang volcano Eruption May 2024

The Philippines is currently facing a catastrophic drought, one of the slow-onset effects of climate change, along with other climate impact drivers such as rising sea levels, increased precipitation, stronger wind patterns, and typhoons. This catastrophic drought is driven by the 2023-24 El Niño, which is, according to the United Nations weather agency, one of the five strongest on record.   Climate Change Commission defines Drought as a decrease of 21 to 60 percent in rain occurrences for five consecutive months, or below normal rainfall conditions for three consecutive months. Additionally, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geographical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) reported on March 25 that 37 provinces have experienced drought conditions (3 consecutive months of way below normal rainfall conditions/more than 60% reduction from rainfall average), 22 provinces with dry spell (3 consecutive months of below normal rainfall condition/21%-60% reduction from rainfall average) and 12 provinces with dry condition (2 consecutive months of below normal rainfall condition).    Five (5) provinces declared a state of calamities due to the worst effects of drought in their area, namely Occidental Mindoro (IV-B), Negros Occidental (VI), Sultan Kudarat (XII), and Maguinadanao Del Norte, Maguindanao Del Sur (BARMM). Besides these provinces, 34 local government units also declared a state of calamity.  According to the data released by the Philippines Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Disaster Response Operations Monitoring and Information Center (DROMIC), as of 24 April 2024, there were 531,114 families or 2,283,636 persons affected in 3,053 villages in 11 Regions. Food and other livelihood support is the main need of the time. It is expected that the need for food and livelihood support in the affected areas is going to increase.  Alert Note by NCCP_Drought Situation in Philippines

The escalating conflict in Gaza that started on the 7th of October has impacted the whole Middle East region, with cross-border incidents into Lebanon. Daily clashes have been reported over the Blue Line, the demarcation line on Lebanon’s southern border since 8th of October. As conflict at Lebanon's border with Israel continues to escalate, the South of Lebanon has been heavily affected by the ongoing cross border conflict and spillover of the Gaza crisis, with frequent clashes, airstrikes and, military operations leading to widespread destruction and loss of life. The escalation of hostilities has forced thousands of families to flee their homes, seeking safety in neighboring areas, makeshift shelters within the region, or moving to other areas in Lebanon. Thousands have lost their homes, possessions, and livelihood assets. As of 12 March, 91,316 individuals (52% females) have been displaced from south Lebanon due to the ongoing hostilities along the Blue Line.  It is estimated that at least 60,000 persons have remained in border villages and are highly affected by exchanges of fire while having lost livelihoods and income and the situation becomes more acute. ACT Lebanon Forum members Christian Aid, DanChurchAid, DSPR- JCC, Middle East Council of Churches (MECC)  and Norwegian Church Aid (NCA) are preparing an appeal for responding to the urgent needs with special focus on people who have been directly affected by the current conflict. ACT-Alert-South Lebanon Response

Armed conflict, extra judicial killings by security forces and political violence in DRC has caused massive displacement across the provinces of Ituri, North Kivu, South Kivu and Tanganyika in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is reported that there is visible movement of displaced persons from areas like Shasha, Kirotse and Sake towards Goma and the Uganda border point of Bunagana. The city of Sake has also been affected by bombs and there have been reports of human rights violations and gender-based violence against women and girls. Children have abandoned their schools; unaccompanied children are also observed in the streets and in the neighborhoods of the city of Goma and its surroundings as well as the city of Minova in South Kivu. The displacement is also caused by rising tensions with neighboring Rwanda on alleged support for militia groups. In DRC the internally displaced populations are living in churches, schools, and open spaces while some of the most vulnerable are hosted by family and friends. In Uganda and Tanzania, refugees are settled in already established refugee camps.  Uganda received 2,551 refugees since January 2024.  As of 19 February, about 14,599 refugees are in Tanzania. The forums in DRC, Uganda, and Tanzania are requesting to launch an ACT appeal to support the ongoing response in these three countries. ACT Alert DRC Conflict

As of February 5, 2024, a mega wildfire has devastated approximately 26,000 hectares. The affected areas include the provinces of Valparaíso and Marga Marga in the Quinta Región, where over 15,000 homes have been completely damaged. The combination of high population density in challenging terrains, prolonged drought, and soaring temperatures in Chile has greatly facilitated the rapid spread of wildfires. This situation is further compounded by the challenges in accessing affected areas and the limited capacity of Chilean institutions and emergency services to contain the fires effectively. UN Chile has reported that this prolonged heatwave commenced in January 2023, which has created the perfect conditions for the escalation of forest fires in this region of the country. Current main impacts:

  • As of February, 372 individuals are reported missing, and it is anticipated that this number will increase. 122 people have lost their lives due to the fire. Furthermore, a total of 40,000 individuals have been significantly and comprehensively affected by the destruction of homes.
  • It has been estimated that affected residences in the Valparaíso region are up to 12,000 in Viña del Mar and 2,000 in Quilpué. Affected people would exceed 38,000 (approximately 31,000 people in Viña del Mar and around 7,000 people in Quilpué).
  • Besides the loss of lives and the devastation of residences, schools, and natural spaces, the impact extends to two ecologically vital areas: the La Campana-Peñuelas Biosphere Reserve, acknowledged as one of Chile's ten biosphere reserves, and the Viña del Mar Botanical Garden, a key green sanctuary in the region.
  • Severe impacts have been identified on critical infrastructure such as homes, businesses, vehicles, recreational spaces, places of worship, and educational facilities, among other aspects, being damaged or destroyed.
  • The population affected is facing considerable mental health challenges as a result of the loss of human and animal lives, the upheaval of their livelihoods, and the complete or partial destruction of their environment, surroundings, and homes.
  • Long-term solutions will be contingent upon political decisions by the Chilean government, while immediate and urgent measures surpass the current capacity of the government. This is evidenced by the significant involvement of private and civic organizations providing assistance to affected families.
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Chile (IELCH) is seeking to provide emergency response to alleviate humanitarian needs caused by the fires in three sectors: Psychosocial Support, Food Security (involving the delivery of food baskets), and WASH (with the distribution of hygiene kits and menstrual hygiene kits). An RRF proposal is being drafted with a budget estimate of approximately USD 150,000 for the successful planning and execution of the above activities. ACT Alert Template Chile Wildfires 2024

A series of explosive eruption from Mt. Lewotobi Laki-Laki occurred from December 23rd to January 1st, 2023. After the eruption on December 23rd, 2023, a crack was seen in the northwest of the peak 160 meters long and emitting thick white smoke with the height around 300 meters. On January 1st, 2024, at 00.03 Central Indonesian Time there was an increase in continuous earthquakes with an amplitude reaching 7 mm. A new eruption center was observed originating from a fracture in the south-southeast of Mt. Lewotobi Laki-Laki’s summit. The eruption occurred 1,000-1,500 meters high from the peak, the eruption ash column was white, grey to black. Based on the government’s report and initial assessment, recently, the disaster indicates in a moderate impact and is categorised as medium-scale emergency. Nevertheless, there is a possibility for status raise since Mt. Lewotobi Laki-Laki’s was increased by PVMBG to Level III since January 1st, 2024. The local government of East Flores District has also declared a disaster emergency alert for 14 days starting from January 1st, 2024. Indonesia forum is planning to respond to the urgent needs of the affected population with life saving activities focus on the most vulnerable population. ACT Alliance members including Pelkesi, YEU, MBM and CWS are currently working in the areas and planning to expand to the affected areas. Indonesia_Alert_Lewotobi Volcano Eruption_2024

On 7 October 2023, Palestinian militant groups launched a major attack on Israel from the Gaza Strip. The attack included rocket barrages and vehicle-transported attacks across the border on Israeli communities and forces. In response, the government of Israel declared a state of emergency and war. The Israeli military retaliated by conducting a counteroffensive and an extensive aerial bombardment campaign on Gaza followed by an invasion. This conflict created a short term crisis for families from Gaza Strip, around 115 families, who were visiting Jordan for family reasons, and university students, around 30 students, who is studying in Jordan and got stuck due to the boarder’s closure who were not able to return back to Gaza which forced them to stay in Jordan with no source of income required in paying their housing rent, securing their daily needs of food and non-food items, medication, and university tuition fees for the students who are already studying at the Jordanian universities and lost all financial support to continue their studies. Adding to that the crises created a negative impact on psychological wellbeing of those who got stuck in Jordan creating the feeling of insecurity and stability. ACT Jordan Forum member DSPR is preparing an RRF for responding to the urgent needs with special focus on people who have been directly affected by the current conflict in Gaza. ACT Alert- Jordan Humanitarian Crisis

Floods that started on 17th October 2023 in Manyara region (northeastern), Kagera and Mwanza regions (northwestern) in Tanzania, linked to the El Nino phenomenon characterized by heavy, excessive. continuous rain that have triggered floods and landslides. The excessive rains have resulted in death, injury and destruction of homes, farms and public property. Flood affected families have been left without food, safe water, shelter, and household items. School classrooms and health structures are also destroyed, and this may disrupt access to education and health services. There has also been a rise of infectious diseases as the flood water is infected. Due to the heavy rains, some communities remain isolated due to the increase in the flow of rivers and streams. Three national members, Council of Churches of Tanzania (CCT), Evangelical Lutheran Church of Tanzania (ELCT)  and Tanganyika Christian Refugee Services (TCRS)  are planning to respond to the effects of the floods. Tanzania Floods  

Team

Niall O’Rourke

Head of Humanitarian Affairs

Global

niall.orourke@actalliance.org

Geneva, Switzerland

Caroline Njogu

Regional Humanitarian Officer

Africa

Caroline.Njogu@actalliance.org

Nairobi, Kenya

Cyra Bullecer

Humanitarian Operations Manager

Global

Cyra.Bullecer@actalliance.org

Bangkok, Thailand

George Majaj

Humanitarian Programme Advisor

MENA

Amman, Jordan