Humanitarian

ACT Alliance demonstrates its value as the leading faith-based alliance in humanitarian response by working with faith and humanitarian actors at the global, regional, national, and community levels. ACT harnesses the combined strength of its members in delivering humanitarian response at scale and with considerable reach through joint programming approaches.

We commit to an effective ecumenical response that saves lives and maintains dignity, irrespective of race, gender, belief, nationality, ethnicity, or political persuasion. Humanitarian needs define our priorities and the humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence guide our actions. We remain committed to strengthening the resilience of affected communities and to being accountable to people and communities affected by a crisis. The ACT Alliance Secretariat is certified against the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability and is committed to the Sphere Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response.

We are active in more than 120 countries worldwide

Through its national, regional and sub-regional forums ACT Alliance provides humanitarian and emergency preparedness support to local communities helping them during a crisis and to become more resilient.

READ MORE

ACT humanitarian mechanism

The Rapid Response Fund is an innovative funding mechanism designed to put local communities at the centre of decision-making and is recognised as one of few such funding mechanisms across the sector. The RRF provides valuable opportunities to demonstrate the niche of faith actors in humanitarian response as we work closely with local ACT members and their community networks. On average, the RRF funds 20 emergencies annually and responses are implemented within six months.

The primary mechanism for large scale or global emergencies, including protracted crises: ACT Alliance raises an appeal to its membership with both requesting and funding members co-owning the process. Appeals are open for funding during their entire project period and accessible to both national and international ACT Alliance members.

Consortia represent a new funding mechanism for ACT Alliance. As part of Emergency Preparedness planning, consortiums are established before a disaster strikes and consortium members share a vision and strategic focus. Members self-organise and develop their own financial management models and programme strategies supported by the EPRP process and tools.

Emergency preparedness and response planning is integral to the strengthening of ACT Alliance’s capacity to respond effectively in emergencies through joint programming.

ACT national and regional forums develop emergency preparedness and response plans (EPRPs), working collaboratively to understand potential disaster risks and plan how to respond to emergencies quickly and effectively. Forum EPRPs are accessible by members through an online platform, which can be viewed by other members who may be interested to support them. ACT Forums use specific ACT guidelines and tools to support the process of developing an EPRP which is reviewed regularly.

EPRP platform

As part of the holistic and integrated approach to humanitarian response, development and advocacy, ACT’s emergency preparedness and humanitarian response is supported by stronger humanitarian coordination and advocacy with stakeholders and duty bearers.

In the current strategic period our advocacy focuses on three banner commitments to the Grand Bargain at the World Humanitarian Summit where ACT has made significant investments and where member engagement is quite strong: the localisation agenda and the primary role of national/local members and local faith actors; demonstrating the important role of faith actors in humanitarian response; and strengthening of cash-based programming across the humanitarian sector.


No.
Name
Date | Time
Location

After nearly 12 years of conflict, and an earthquake of 7.8 magnitude that hit its foundation, Syria remains a complex humanitarian and protection emergency characterized by ongoing hostilities and their long-term consequences, including widespread destruction of civilian infrastructure, economic collapse, explosive ordnance contamination, Covid 19, and one of the largest number of internally displaced people in the world. An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8, with at least 1,200 aftershocks have been reported, followed by a second earthquake of 7.5 magnitude, at a depth of 17.925 km (11.14 miles) has occurred at Central Turkey near the city of Gaziantep, as reported by the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) of the USGS on February 06, 2023, 01:41:15 UTC. Analysis indicates that this is a very strong earthquake. Widespread building collapse has been reported in southeast Turkey and northern Syria. The earthquake was also felt across Lebanon, Cyprus and the region while it is expected that aftershocks which may be at the same intensity as the initial earthquake will be felt for weeks. There have been more than 23,000 deaths reported as at the 11th of February between Turkey and Syria, with 14,014 in Turkey and 4,377 in Syria, and almost 7,700 people injured in Syria. With thousands of collapsed buildings, (around 1,765 totally destroyed and 5,571 partially destroyed , in addition to 115 schools were destroyed in Aleppo, Hama, and Lattakia cities ).  Many people remain trapped under the debris of collapsed buildings, rescue and search are fearing its too late finding anyone alive under the rubble. Flooding has been reported in displacement camps due to inclement winter weather. The Syrian population was already deeply affected by the ongoing war and the economic collapse of the country and now, many people must deal with being displaced, losing their livelihood, and fighting the harsh winter conditions. ACT Syria Forum members CA, GOPA-DERD, HEKS/EPER, LWF and MECC will respond to the protracted crisis and the earthquake with an appeal to raise USD13,847,370 over two years, As of this publication, the appeal has raised USD4,314,845.  In this appeal revision, Hungarian Interchurch Aid joins the ACT Alliance response and will provide assistance to the people affected by the earthquake in Türkiye, with a budget of USD513,764. SYR231 - Syria Response Revision 2 SYR231 Results Framework Revision 2  Links to the previous versions: https://actalliance.org/appeals-rapid-response-funds/syria-syria-protracted-crisis-developing-the-resilience-of-affected-people-syr231   https://actalliance.org/appeals-rapid-response-funds/syria-syria-protracted-crisis-developing-the-resilience-of-affected-people-and-emergency-response-for-affected-communities-of-syria-turkiye-earthquake-syr231-revision-1  

Due to the effects of Cyclone Freddy, most parts of Southern Malawi were severely hit by heavy persistent rains and strong winds from 10th to 14th March 2023. When the cyclone made landfall, many houses were carried by flood water and buried by landslides (as it occurred at night). According to the latest UNOCHA situation report (25th March 2023), Cyclone Freddy has significantly impacted livelihoods in Malawi, with over 194,500 livestock dead and nearly 91,000 injured, while over 204,800 hectares of land have been submerged or washed away (Source: UNOCHA Flash Update 9). Cyclone Freddy has also damaged or destroyed 547 schools (484 primary and 63 secondary schools). In the aftermath of Tropical Cyclone Freddy, there are currently 563,771 people internally displaced residing in 577 camps. As of 24th March, 511 deaths were reported, at least 1,724 people are injured, while 533 people are still missing according to Malawi’s Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA). Following the Cyclone, the President of Malawi declared a State of Disaster in the most affected region (Southern Region). In Mozambique, Cyclone Freddy made landfall first on 24th February 2023 in Inhambane Province and later in Zambezia Province, on 11th March 2023. Prior to Cyclone Freddy, most of Southern Mozambique was already affected by floods caused by heavy rains in the region. The most affected provinces are Zambezia (741,136 people), Sofala (139,553 people), and Inhambane (107,614 people). The number of deaths has risen to 173 people of whom, 157 people in Zambezia (OCHA Situation Report 30th March 2023). ACT Malawi Forum's two national members CARD and ELDS will respond in Nsanje, Chikwawa, Phalombe, and Mulanje districts, while in Mozambique DKH through national members CEDES and CCM will respond in Zambezia Province, Sofala Province, Gaza Province, and Niassa Province through a regional appeal. SAF231 Response to Cyclone Freddy SAF 231 Results Framework

Madagascar was affected by Cyclone Freddy in Mananjary District from 21st - 22nd February 2023 causing massive floods. Due to the cyclone, 3,649 houses were flooded, 1,355 huts were damaged or destroyed and thousands were displaced. The flooded fields have destroyed the harvest. ACT National member in Madagascar SAF/FJKM with ACT Rapid Response funding, will support the affected households with food aid and livelihood support by providing them with seeds and technical know-how for improved livelihoods. RRF 03 2023 Madagascar Cyclone Freddy

Jordan is a middle-income country with 11.2 million people, including 3.4 million non-citizens (refugees and migrant workers). The country hosts the second-highest share of refugees per capita in the world, putting unprecedented pressure on its budgetary and natural resources, infrastructure, and labour market. Today, Jordan hosts 1.36 million Syrian refugees (including the registered refuges in UNHCR), this represents nearly 15% of Jordan’s total population. The Syria crisis with its multifaceted impact has exacerbated various aspects of life in Jordan including security, economy, and social factors amongst others, these factors are playing a role in increasing the vulnerability of both Syrian refugees and Jordanians. ACT Jordan Forum members DSPR, ELCJHL and MECC will respond to the protracted crisis with an appeal to raise 1,364,573USD aiming to  improving the living conditions and responding to the urgent needs of Syrian refugees, host communities and vulnerable groups in Jordan. JOR231 Appeal JOR231- Results Framwork

The situations in DRC and South Sudan remain fragile and unpredictable and many IDPs settlements in DRC are camped very close to the border of Uganda ready to flee into Uganda in case of an eruption of conflict. During the first two months of 2023, Uganda received 13,622 refugees (5,378 Congolese and 8,244 South Sudanese)1 of which 66.8% were Congolese refugees. The revised appeal is requesting an increased budget and a three months extension of the project period (indicated in red font). The violence has caused an unprecedented large-scale influx of refugees into neighboring Uganda, leaving refugees with unmet basic needs in sectors such as food, WASH, education, protection, gender, livelihoods, and peaceful co-existence. ACT Uganda Forum members LWF, FCA, DCA, and HEKS plan to respond to the refugee crisis. Uganda_Response to Congolese Refugee Influx_Revision 1 UGA 221_Response to Influx of Refugees in Uganda_Results Framework - Revised - 9th March 2023

The Global Rapid Response Fund (GRRF) is an annual funding appeal administered by the ACT Alliance secretariat. The fund prioritises ACT local and national members in line with our localisation commitments and in recognition of the distinct advantage these members have in providing timely, high quality, locally led emergency response interventions. Funds for the RRF are provided by ACT Alliance members and non-members. The total request for funding this year is USD1,571,089 with a total budget of USD3,000,000, and with last year's balance carried over of USD1,428,911.  This request will provide assistance in communities impacted by humanitarian crises up to 20 local contexts with a maximum funding ceiling of USD$150,000 per local member. GRRF proposals are assessed based on the ACT Scale up criteria which includes a requirement for requesting members to include a needs assessment and updated EPRP as part of their application for funding. RRF funding projects are normally between a minimum two and maximum six-month duration.  GRRF23 Appeal  

An over-reliance on rain-dependent agriculture coupled with the effects of climate change has been considered one of Tanzania’s greatest challenges to poverty reduction and alleviation. The rainfall patterns in Tanzania over the past two years (2021-2022) have been below average; causing a severe drought. The most affected regions are the northern-eastern and central regions (UNOCHA,30 /12/2022). Due to the drought, crop harvests have reduced drastically, pasture for livestock has become scarce and water availability for both domestic and livestock use is very limited. Prices of staple foods have been rising progressively due to the dry weather conditions; diminishing access to food for the poorer sections of the population, leading to food insecurity in many households. The populations at greatest risk are those that are dependent on rain-fed agriculture, as their livelihoods are highly exposed to climate change. ACT Tanzania forum led by the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Tanzania (ELCT) will respond to the drought emergency in Tanzania through Rapid Response Fund by supporting 6,000 persons with food and nutrition in three villages in Mwanga district of Kilimanjaro region, Northern Tanzania. RRF 02 2023 Tanzania Drought

After nearly 12 years of conflict, and an earthquake of 7.8 magnitude that hit its foundation, Syria remains a complex humanitarian and protection emergency characterized by ongoing hostilities and their long-term consequences, including widespread destruction of civilian infrastructure, economic collapse, explosive ordnance contamination, Covid 19, and one of the largest number of internally displaced people in the world. An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8, with at least 1,200 aftershocks have been reported, followed by a second earthquake of 7.5 magnitude, at a depth of 17.925 km (11.14 miles) has occurred at Central Turkey near the city of Gaziantep, as reported by the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) of the USGS on February 06, 2023, 01:41:15 UTC. Analysis indicates that this is a very strong earthquake. Widespread building collapse has been reported in southeast Turkey and northern Syria. The earthquake was also felt across Lebanon, Cyprus and the region while it is expected that aftershocks which may be at the same intensity as the initial earthquake will be felt for weeks. There have been more than 23,000 deaths reported as at the 11th of February between Turkey and Syria, with 14,014 in Turkey and 4,377 in Syria, and almost 7,700 people injured in Syria. With thousands of collapsed buildings, (around 1,765 totally destroyed and 5,571 partially destroyed , in addition to 115 schools were destroyed in Aleppo, Hama, and Lattakia cities ).  Many people remain trapped under the debris of collapsed buildings, rescue and search are fearing its too late finding anyone alive under the rubble. Flooding has been reported in displacement camps due to inclement winter weather. The Syrian population was already deeply affected by the ongoing war and the economic collapse of the country and now, many people must deal with being displaced, losing their livelihood, and fighting the harsh winter conditions. ACT Syria Forum members CA, GOPA-DERD, HEKS/EPER, LWF and MECC will respond to the protracted crisis and the earthquake with an appeal to raise 11,166,997 USD over two years, to respond to the needs of the Affected Communities of Syria-Türkiye Earthquake and to improve the resilience of the crisis-affected populations in Syria. (Total income as of 13/2/2023: 356,305 USD and the Balance requested: 10,810,692 USD). SYR231 - Protracted Crisis-Earthquake Response Results-Framework SYR231- Revision1

On October 30, the NDRRMC recommended to President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. to declare a one-year state of national calamity after STS Nalgae battered almost the whole country and left 162 fatalities and caused gargantuan damage to infrastructures and livelihoods. However, the current administration has only issued the proposed proclamation for four regions (Regions 4A, 5, 6 and BARMM) with more than 1.4 million residents. Pre-emptively, the government evacuated over 356,000 persons but currently almost 349,000 persons are still displaced. As the climate negotiations is currently taking place, the Philippines is living with massive loss and damage. STS Nalgae alone damaged 64,209 houses of which 57,888 are partially damaged while 6,361 are unliveable. While the damage to infrastructure and agriculture marks a skyrocketing cost of Php 12 billion particularly affecting 146,927 farmers and fisherfolk[1]. This is on top of the already huge loss and damage caused by the recent Typhoon Karding, some in the same areas hit by STS Nalgae. Relief efforts from the government, NGOs and other stakeholders have undertaken but much effort is needed to contribute to the recovery of the most vulnerable population affected by these climate-induced weather events. According to the Joint Rapid Needs Assessment conducted by BARMM government partners and the MHT, the priority humanitarian needs include food, WASH and NFIs including hygiene kits, sleeping kits and kitchen/cooking sets. Most of the water sources are either destroyed or contaminated which is further damaging the health as toilets have been submerged or destroyed by floods. To Respond to the urgent needs of the affected people the National Council of Churches Philippines designed a 4 months response project which will provide relief assistance to 2,100 families or 10,500 persons from the priority areas in the regions of Cagayan Valley, Bicol and Panay Island. In coordination with the local churches, ecumenical partners and authorities in the target areas, the following activities will be undertaken within the next four months: 1. Provision of multi-purpose cash assistance to 1200 families 2. Distribution of food assistance to 900 families 3. Distribution of hygiene and sanitation kits to 2100 families RRF 01 2023 Philippines Typhoon Nalgae

After nearly 12 years of conflict, Syria remains a complex humanitarian and protection emergency characterized by ongoing hostilities and their long-term consequences, including widespread destruction of civilian infrastructure, economic collapse, explosive ordnance contamination and one of the largest number of internally displaced people in the world. In many ways, the humanitarian needs across the whole of Syria are currently at their highest since the start of the conflict, and households are reverting to negative coping mechanisms more frequently than before. This includes child labour, child marriage, sale of productive assets, and borrowing, all of which increase protection needs and/or reduce households’ capacity for self-sustenance in the future. As household resilience decreases, humanitarian needs increase. ACT Syria Forum members CA, GOPA-DERD, HEKS/EPER and MECC will respond to the protracted crisis with an appeal to raise 5,115,528 USD over two years, to improve the resilience of the crisis-affected populations in Syria. SYR231 - Syria Protracted Crisis Results-Framework - SYR231   

Clashes across the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border, in the Bulak-Bashi area of the Batken region (Kyrgyzstan) erupted on 14 September 2022 between the troops of Kyrgyzstan and of Tajikistan, which escalated into an International Armed Conflict, each accusing one another of using tanks, mortars, rocket artillery and assault drones to attack the outpost. A state of emergency was declared on 16 September 2022 in the Batken region of Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan share 984 km of border, 30% of which is still disputed and leads to tensions due to lack of access to water, roads and pastures and nearby settlements. The surroundings of Batken airport and objects on the outskirts of the city were also shelled. As per official data, the total death toll was 39 and 135 people were injured on the Tajik side, 59 people were killed, among them women and children and more than 100 were injured on the Kyrgyz side. Over 140 thousand civilians evacuated the conflict zone to the safer region (Kadamjai and Razzakov cities) of Batken and have become IDPs. At this moment Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan has signed peace memorandum. In mid-october Kyrgyz delegation visited in Dushanbe, Tajikistan to discuss further delimitation and demarcation process. Two sides plan to revise archive documents and maps from the Soviet time. Recently, the Defence Minister of Kyrgyzstan declared that Kyrgyzstan will not give up even 1 cm of its land, but ready to resolve the issue peacefully, unless the sovereignty and inviolability of borders are kept. It is observed that both sides are upgrading their military capacities. The situation is tense, and risk of future conflicts is high. ACT Europe Forum through Hungarian Interchurch Aid seek to provide humanitarian assistance to affected families. This proposal is in compliance with the criteria for an exceptional circumstance where (a) There are no ACT national members present in Kyrgyztan and (b) Funding is allocated to an international member with an additional objective to provide capacity to support to an ACT national member or local partner.  This response will be implemented by Hungarian Interchurch Aid’s local partner, Insan Leilek Public Foundation. To that end, an RRF of 124,866USD has been approved. RRF 19 2022 HIA Batken Border Clashes Response

Four years after the end of large-scale military operations against ISIL, the humanitarian context in Iraq remains fragile. Prone to political instability, violence, corruption, armed conflict and natural disasters, Iraq is an anomaly of an upper middle-income country at “very high risk” and requiring international assistance. Protracted displacement has come to characterize the post-conflict environment, with eroded national social cohesion, extensive explosive ordnance contamination, and incomplete rehabilitation of housing, basic services and livelihoods opportunities. About 1.2 million people remain internally displaced, more than 90 per cent of whom fled their areas of origin more than four years ago. Protracted displacement is expected to continue over the next few years. Barriers to return, local integration or resettlement remain significant. Climate change is a growing threat in Iraq. According to the UNEP (2022), Iraq has been ranked at the 5th most affected country by climate change in the world. Temperatures are soaring to new extremes as degrees above 50°C are becoming common, compounding the situation further into a complex humanitarian crisis. Water scarcity is forecasted to significantly impact this season’s crop production, which could further impact people’s livelihoods and food security status as well as increase the risk of cholera or other diseases. Climate-induced migration has already been witnessed in the worst-hit parts of the country. ACT Iraq Forum members LWF and HIA will respond to the protracted crisis with an appeal to raise USD3,104,757 over two years, to improve access to durable solutions to the crisis-affected populations (IDPs, refugees, returnees and host communities) in Iraq. IRQ231 Protracted Humanitarian Crisis in Iraq IRQ231 - Results Framework


No.
Name
Date | Time
Location

On may 3rd violence broke out in Manipur state of India after Naga and Kuki tribals organised a 'Tribal Solidarity March' to protest moves to give scheduled tribe status to the majority Metei community. Internet services, including mobile internet, were suspended across the state and Section 144 was imposed in several violence-hit areas of the state to stop the violence. More than 30,000 people have been displaced due to conflict to camps and shelter identified by the government and law enforcement agencies. As these communities are not able to do business as usual There is a pressing necessity to provide immediate assistance to minimize loss of life and to ensure that the needs of the most vulnerable are covered first. The violence has happened in the district of Imphal, Churachandpur, Bishnupur, Kangpokni, Tengnaupal. Kakching, Thoubal, Jiribam and Bishnupur in the state of Manipur. The people need Food, Shelter and Sanitation to restore to their normal life. They may also need counselling and confidence building measures ACT Manipur Alert Revised, 16th May

On April 15th, 2023, marked the day a violent power struggle broke out in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital city between the two main warring factions; the ruling militia regime (Sudanese Armed Forces-SAF) which is currently acting as the official Army of the country and a rival paramilitary force; the Rapid Support Forces (RSF). The violence broke out due to high rising tension between the country’s most powerful generals, who jointly staged coup d’état in October 2021. As of 14th May,2023, an estimated 900 civilians have been killed and a further 4,000+ injured, whereas an estimated 5 million Sudanese are internally displaced and 1 million flown to neighbouring countries. Sudan: As a result of the war 936,000 people have been newly displaced including 736,200 people displaced internally and 200,000 who have crossed into neighbouring countries. Women and children represent 75 per cent of those affected by this conflict that have become more vulnerable. This includes an estimated 450,000 children who have fled their homes. South Sudan: 59,229 (53% female,47%male) individuals had cross into South Sudan. 94% these are South Sudanese returnees. According to UNHCR estimates, between 125,000 and 180,000 South Sudanese and 45,000 Sudanese are expected to arrive in the next three months. Ethiopia: More than 20,400 people have crossed Ethiopia’s Metema border and 5,300 in Almahal, Benishangul-Gumuz Region. Most of these are Ethiopian returnees. Chad: The total number of refugee arrivals from Sudan has exceeded 50,000 (18,500male, 31,500 female) UNHCR projects a total of 100,000 Sudanese refugees in Chad by the end of May. Egypt: 81,172 people have crossed into Egypt, including 76,135 Sudanese and 5,037 third-country nationals. It is estimated that up to 300,000 Sudanese people are expected to cross the Egyptian borders over the next few months. ACT National Forums/ members of (Sudan, South Sudan, Chad, Ethiopia, Egypt)  are preparing  an Sub regional response/ appeal to respond to the needs of the affected communities and countries of the Sudan crisis. ACT members NCA, LWF, CA,  Presbyterian Relief and Development Agency (PRDA), Mission 21, EECMY-DASSC, EoC-DICAC and BLESS, this includes DKH support to LWF Chad,  are getting ready to respond to the crisis with focus on sectors of Food security, Health, WASH Education, MHPSS, CASH, Protection and other sectors based on needed. ACT Alert Sudan-Sub regional

Tropical Cyclone Freddy which is the longest-ever recorded cyclone, characterized by torrential rains, floods, and mudslides in Mozambique and southern Malawi has brought devastating effects. The Cyclone has caused severe flooding affecting homes, hampering access, and increasing the danger of flooding and death. Critical roads, electricity, and communication are destroyed in the most affected areas in Malawi and Mozambique. The floods and increasing water levels due to the rains are causing the displacement of people.   Cyclone Freddy is a large-scale emergency that hit Malawi and Mozambique. Both countries' governments are calling for international support. The persons affected are mainly poor rural farmers in both countries.  he Cyclone has been razing buildings, damaging farmland, critical infrastructure (especially roads), and telecommunications, and causing severe flooding and landslides people have been forced from their homes and are displaced in schools and churches. Others are hosted by families. Livelihoods have been lost because the Cyclone has swept away/destroyed most farm crops and farmers were about to harvest their crops. Most farmers have also lost their livestock due to drowning.   ACT Forum members in Malawi (CARD, ELDS) and ACT Forum member in Mozambique (DKH) are launching a regional appeal to respond to the effects of the Cyclone. ACT Alert Malawi-Cyclone Freddy

The strongest cyclone to make landfall in Madagascar in the last 12 months was "Freddy". It reached a speed of up to 165 km/h near the city of Mananjary on February 21, 2023, at 21:00 (local time) and had a diameter of 5 km. According to the international classification, this corresponded to a category 2 cyclone. As a result, 6,465 houses are flooded causing displacement for 37,731 persons. Unfortunately, 07 persons have lost their lives. ACT Madagascar national member SAF/FJKM (Church of Jesus Christ in Madagascar-FJKM) which has 59 branches over the areas affected by Cyclone Freddy is planning to support the displaced meet their basic needs through Rapid Response Funds. Madagascar Tropical Storm Freddy

An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8, with at least 78 aftershocks have been reported followed by a second earthquake of 7.5 magnitude, at a depth of 17.925 km (11.14 miles) has occurred at Central Turkey near the city of Gaziantep, as reported by the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) of the USGS on February 06, 2023, 01:41:15 UTC. Preliminary analysis indicates that this is a very strong earthquake, and it is very shallow (shallower quakes generally tend to be more damaging than deeper quakes). Widespread building collapse has been reported in southeast Turkey and northern Syria. The earthquake was also felt across Lebanon, Cyprus and the region while it is expected that aftershocks which may be at the same intensity as the initial earthquake will be felt for weeks. In Syria, there have been 783 deaths based on early reports (403 in the government-controlled areas and 380 in the uncontrolled areas), 1,315 injuries, and 4,000 damaged buildings and still hundreds of trapped civilians under the rubble. Death toll has reached more than 1,500 based on the latest reports in Turkey, less than 24 hours after the disaster, and 2,300 have been injured and search and rescue operations are ongoing in several major cities, and a total of 1,718 collapsed buildings destroyed in Turkey’s Gaziantep and Kahramanmaras provinces, said Vice President Fuat Otkay. The Syrian population was already deeply affected by the ongoing war and the economic collapse of the country and now, many people must deal with being displaced, losing their livelihood, and fighting the harsh winter conditions. Due to the nature of this emergency, the forum is planning to respond , by requesting RRF as an emergency support and then may be followed by an appeal, based on the results of the assessment. Budgets have not been estimated as members are still conducting their assessments, which will be presented during the Emergency Steering Committee meeting. ACT Alert- Syria_Turkey Earthquake

Reaching its thirteenth year of war, Syria remains a complex humanitarian and protection emergency both inside Syria and the neighboring countries. Jordan hosted more than 672,000 registered Syrian refugees, however the actual total is estimated at around 1.3 million when those not registered are considered. Around 90% of the Syrian refugees live outside the camps in urban, peri-urban, and rural areas, with almost 80% of the Syrian refugees live below the poverty line in Jordan. Most Syrian families are relying on humanitarian assistance to meet their basic needs. The impact of Syrian’s refugee crisis on the Jordan’s economy is high. There are significant structural issues facing the Jordanian economy: insufficient revenue, costly subsidies and a large public sector, water scarcity, and dependence on energy imports. These continue to impact growth, and the situation of Jordanians, particularly in the hosting communities, is becoming more difficult. The crisis also has its huge impact on the socio-economic situation of Jordanians and other population segments such as Palestinian refugees and other refugee population. The crisis has incredible cost for Jordanian families, specifically the younger Jordanian workforce. The crisis added increasing competition on natural resources and added more pressure on protected areas especially in the northern and eastern parts of the country. It has created more pressure on ecosystem goods and services and had very negative impact on waste management that increased by 30% which was generated because of receiving more than a million of Syrian refugees. ACT Jordan forum is preparing an appeal to respond to the needs of the affected communities. ACT members: DSPR, ELCJHL, and MECC are getting ready to respond to the protracted humanitarian crisis with focus on sectors of Livelihoods, Food security, Health, Education, and Protection. Alert-Humanitarian Protracted Crisis- Jordan

ACT-Alert-Tanzania Forum 5 Dec 2022 - Final Tanzania for the past two years 2021-2022 have been characterized by a below average rainfall during the rainy seasons (March- May and October-December) the lowest ever experienced since 1970 causing a severe drought. The most affected regions are the northern-eastern coastlands/highlands. Drought condition is observed more frequently in parts of the northern and central regions. The Ministry of livestock has reported at least 157,695 cattle, 48,290 goats,94,230 sheep’s, 6,135 donkeys and 8 camels have died in Coast, Tanga, Kilimanjaro, Arusha and Manyara regions between September 2021 to January 2022 and recently at least 320 cattle and 250 goats have died due to drought in Tanzania's northern region of Kilimanjaro between July and September 2022 . The drought has affected harvest of major crops, increased crop pests, reduced availability of water and reduced pasture for livestock. Food prices have increased significantly, thus affecting the purchasing power of vulnerable members of the affected communities. The Government of Tanzania identified gaps in response to the drought and developed the 2022-2023 Drought Contingency Plan (DCP). These gaps based on three hazards: Drought; Disease outbreak and pest outbreak. The 2022-2023 planning envisions Drought in the following: • Above 120,000 households require food assistance. • Immediate agricultural response will be required to assist affected households with drought tolerant crops • Government Strategic Grain Reserves (SGR) will not be sufficient to cater for the population due to the huge numbers of affected population. • Response may be in form of food aid and cash transfers • Protection services will be required to prevent and respond to violence in the home and abuse related to accessing food assistance and social support services; ensure equitable access to humanitarian services by vulnerable household

On October 30, the NDRRMC recommended to President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. to declare a one-year state of national calamity after STS Nalgae battered almost the whole country and left 162 fatalities and caused gargantuan damage to infrastructures and livelihoods. However, the current administration has only issued the proposed proclamation for four regions (Regions 4A, 5, 6 and BARMM) with more than 1.4 million residents. Pre-emptively, the government evacuated over 356,000 persons but currently almost 349,000 persons are still displaced. As the climate negotiations is currently taking place, the Philippines is living with massive loss and damage. STS Nalgae alone damaged 64,209 houses of which 57,888 are partially damaged while 6,361 are unliveable. While the damage to infrastructure and agriculture marks a skyrocketing cost of Php 12 billion particularly affecting 146,927 farmers and fisherfolk[1]. This is on top of the already huge loss and damage caused by the recent Typhoon Karding, some in the same areas hit by STS Nalgae. Relief efforts from the government, NGOs and other stakeholders have undertaken but much effort is needed to contribute to the recovery of the most vulnerable population affected by these climate-induced weather events. According to the Joint Rapid Needs Assessment conducted by BARMM government partners and the MHT, the priority humanitarian needs include food, WASH and NFIs including hygiene kits, sleeping kits and kitchen/cooking sets. Most of the water sources are either destroyed or contaminated which is further damaging the health as toilets have been submerged or destroyed by floods. In the initial days of emergency people were evacuated to safer places, but they cannot stay long as many IDPs are concerned that if they stay much longer at the evacuation sites, as food assistance from the government is limited.  Furthermore, the IDPs expressed the need to be assisted with the rehabilitation of their livelihoods. Agriculture is amongst the most affected sectors in the current disasters in Philippines which is affecting the overall food security issues for the local and also contributing to the price hike Alert- Typhoon Nalgae (Local name Paeng)

 

 
 

An earthquake with a magnitude of 5.6 at a depth of 10.0 KM(6.21 miles) has occurred at Southwest Cianjur District – West Java, Indonesia, as reported by Indonesia’s Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) on November 21, 2022, 13:21:10 (GMT+7). The earthquake are not tsunami potential, with epicentrum latitude 6,84 and longitude 107,05 and impacted several location in: 10 km Southwest Cianjur District; 15 km Northeast Sukabumi city; 39 km Southeast Bogor City; 63 km Northwest Bandung; and 78 km Southeast Jakarta. Until Tuesday, November 22, 2022, 06:30:00 (GMT+7), around 118 aftershocks were recorded with magnitudes ranging from 1,5 to 4,2. According to BMKG, the earthquake is the shallow-type quake caused by Cimandiri Fault activity. The Government of Indonesia has declared this disaster as an Emergency Response Status and is requesting the involvement of many parties for managing the disaster.

The Regional Disaster Management Agency (BPBD) of Cianjur District on Tuesday (22/11) at 16:00:00 (GMT+7) reported that there were 268 casualties, mostly because they were hit by collapsed building materials when the quake happened. The Indonesian Red Cross declared that some casualties were children. As many as 151 persons are declared missing and the search is still ongoing, while as many as 1.083 persons are injured. The total affected community in Cianjur District are 169.124 persons while around 58.362 people took refuge in other areas as IDPs. As for now, the total affected population which are reported to evacuate are increasing to 7.060 persons, divided in some evacuation points. The earthquake has caused infrastructure damages in Cianjur District, whether houses or public facilities. It is recorded that 12.641 houses are minorly damaged, 2.071 houses are mildly damaged, 6.570 houses are heavily damaged, 1 unit of Islamic boarding school is heavily damaged, 4 unit of government buildings are damaged, 3 unit of educational structures are damaged, 1 unit of worship place are damaged, and 1 regional public hospital (Cianjur Regional Public Hospital) are mildly damaged. Other than Cianjur District, infrastructure damages are also reported in Bogor Districts (46 houses with mild damage), Sukabumi District (443 houses with heavy damage), and in Sukabumi city (14 houses with minor damage). The earthquake also caused landslides that blocked provincial roads in Cianjur District.

ACT Alliance is considering to support the earthquake emergency support by mobilizing funds from the RRF

Indonesia_Alert_Cianjur Earthquake.  

Clashes across the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border, in the Bulak-Bashi area of the Batken region (Kyrgyzstan) erupted on 14 September 2022 between the troops of Kyrgyzstan and of Tajikistan, which escalated into an International Armed Conflict, each accusing one another of using tanks, mortars, rocket artillery and assault drones to attack the outpost. A ceasefire was instigated, yet intermittent heavy artillery and gunfire continued in several border villages during 16-20 September. A renewed ceasefire prevails, yet the situation remains tense. A state of emergency was declared on 16 September 2022 in the Batken region of Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan share 984 km of border, 30% of which is still disputed and leads to tensions due to lack of access to water, roads and pastures and nearby settlements. The surroundings of Batken airport and objects on the outskirts of the city were also shelled. As per official data, the total death toll was 39 and 135 people were injured on the Tajik side, 59 people were killed, among them women and children and more than 100 were injured on the Kyrgyz side. Over 140 thousand civilians evacuated the conflict zone to the safer region (Kadamjai and Razzakov cities) of Batken and have become IDPs. ACT Europe Forum through Hungarian Interchurch Aid working with local partners will access ACT’s Rapid Response Fund to provide assistance to affected population. Alert_Batken_Border_Clashes

Iraq is facing a protracted humanitarian crises caused by the ISIS conflict that occurred from 2014-2018 and the subsequent forced displacement of over 6 million people. While it has now been four years since the liberation from ISIS, the impacts of the conflict remain significant across the country, with continued displacement, destruction in basic infrastructure, continued violent conflict and insecurity, protection violations, and lack of livelihoods opportunities which has been further exacerbated by the political and economic crisis in Iraq. Moreover, according to the UNEP (2022), Iraq has been ranked at the 5th most affected country by climate change in the world. Temperatures are soaring to new extremes as degrees above 50°C are becoming common, compounding the situation further into a complex humanitarian crisis. ACT Iraq forum is preparing an appeal to respond to the needs of the affected communities. ACT members: HIA and LWF are getting ready for a response to provide durable solutions to the protracted humanitarian crisis in this complex environment with focus on sectors of WASH, Livelihoods (food security and agriculture), Protection and Social Cohesion. Alert- Iraq Protracted Crisis

In the early hours of September 13, 2022, the Azerbaijani military forces launched a large-scale coordinated attack against the sovereign territory of the Republic of Armenia targeting the peaceful borderline communities in the regions of Gegharkunik, Vayots Dzor and Syunik of Armenia. The Azerbaijani armed forces used different weapons, including heavy artillery, mortars of various calibres, UAVs, and large-calibre guns. The emergency is small scale, however, there is a concern for a large-scale offensive. The primary geographical focus of the attack is 3 regions of Armenia (Gegharkunik, Vayots Dzor and Syunik) including the cities and villages of Kapan, Goris, Jermuk, Vardenis, Sotk, Norabak, Kut, Geghamasar and other borderline communities. According to the Statistical Committee of the Republic of Armenia, by the beginning of the 2020 year population in these 3 regions are as follows։ Gegharkunik region - a total of 222.7 thousand persons (66.6 urban and 161.1 rural), Vayots Dzor region - a total of 48.5 thousand persons (48.5 urban and 31.4 rural), Syunik region - total 137.3 thousand persons (93.2 urban and 44.1 rural). ACT Armenia Forum through the Armenian Round Table will access ACT’s Rapid Response Fund to provide assistance in affected regions. Alert_Armenia_Armed Conflict  

Team

Niall O’Rourke

Head of Humanitarian Affairs

Global

niall.orourke@actalliance.org

Geneva, Switzerland

Caroline Njogu

Regional Humanitarian Officer

Africa

Caroline.Njogu@actalliance.org

Nairobi, Kenya

Cyra Bullecer

Humanitarian Operations Manager

Global

Cyra.Bullecer@actalliance.org

Bangkok, Thailand

George Majaj

Humanitarian Programme Advisor

MENA

Amman, Jordan